Shop, Eat, Repeat

A few weeks ago, I posted a few simple recipes we made with ingredients from our CSA basket. Since then, several folks have asked for more summer dining and meal planning tips, so I thought this might be a great time to share a bit about what we eat on a daily basis. Minimalist meals have four things in common:

  • They are quick and easy to prepare.
  • They make use of the same basic ingredients, just in different combinations.
  • They are nutritious (and in this case, plant-based).
  • They are very inexpensive (in fact, some are even downright cheap!).

So, without further ado, here’s what the Minimalists Next Door eat for:

Breakfast

  • Oats with berries, apple tidbits, or raisins
  • Organic whole grain cereal with nut or flax milk and a bowl of fruit
  • Whole wheat toast and a banana
  • Banana flour pancakes with fruit topping (on Sundays only)

Lunch

  • PB&J with chips and a fruit bowl
  • Salad and a fruit bowl
  • Veggie wraps with hummus
  • Grilled pepper and onion quesadilla with chips and salsa
  • Leftovers from dinner

Dinner

  • Tropical Bowl – brown rice, black or pinto beans, corn, and salsa
  • Asian Bowl – whole wheat spaghetti noodles, sautéed onions, peppers, and seasonal veggies with low-sodium soy sauce
  • Homemade pizza topped with kale or spinach and seasonal veggies
  • Italian Bowl – whole wheat pasta with seasonal veggies like eggplant, zucchini, and carrots in a tomato-based sauce
  • Breakfast – either a frittata or scrambled eggs with grits and Hilary’s Veggie Sausage
  • Veggie burgers with baked potato cubes and a salad
  • Veggie plate – any combination of vegetables on hand with a baked potato or a whole grain side, like quinoa, barley, or brown rice

Snacks

  • Hummus and pita chips
  • Almond or coconut milk yogurt
  • Fresh fruit
  • Nuts
  • Granola (loose or bars)
  • Popcorn

The fruits and vegetables change throughout the year and in the winter, we add homemade soups and chili to the lineup, but as you can see, we eat pretty much the same things all the time. This makes shopping easier since we can buy a lot of the stock items in bulk. It also makes meal prep easy. We can chop most of the veggies for salads, wraps, and bowls in advance and use them throughout the week. Same goes for fruits. When it comes to beverages, we rotate through three options there as well – coffee, tea, and water.

Does your family have a standard or rotating menu? What are some of your favorite quick meals?

3 thoughts on “Shop, Eat, Repeat

  1. We also belong to a CSA so I’m always looking to use the veggies. I roast a lot of veggies that might not get used otherwise, specifically radishes and “salad” turnips. Toss them with some Braggs Liquid Aminos or soy sauce and a small bit of olive oil and roast. They lose the bite that way. I also like roasted rutabaga, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, and parsnips although I usually change the seasoning on these.

    Other basic seasoning for anything that’s sautéed is a garlic/ginger combo with soy sauce and a splash of toasted sesame oil at the end. Saute some onion and sweet potato with garlic and ginger until almost cooked. Add shredded Swiss Chard, kale or spinach and season with soy sauce. Cover and let steam a bit and add toasted sesame oil as a seasoning at the end. Serve with beans and starch of your choice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great ideas! Thank you so much! Radishes, turnips, and beets are on my “least favorites” list so I will definitely try roasting them. Do you like Braggs better than soy sauce? I’ve heard of it but never tried it.

      Like

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