Let’s Talk Turkey

In just a few days, many of us will sit down to a festive meal with our families. A lot of turkeys will be served, maybe a few hams, mashed potatoes, green beans, rolls, and possibly an assortment of pies and cakes. Growing up, I remember spending Thanksgiving with my grandparents. My reclusive uncle and aunt would put in an appearance, usually late, and my parents would spend the better part of the day just chatting with them while we played in the den. The day was priceless…phenomenal food, good company, and nowhere to be but there.

After my parents divorced when I was a teenager, I don’t really remember very many specific Thanksgivings and Turkey Days as a young adult were hit or miss for me. Some were spent at my Dad’s house, some at my Mom’s, some at my own house, where my Mom, my Granny, and I would work all day to prepare the meal, and even a few took place at the homes of friends. Back then, Thanksgiving was simply the gateway to Christmas; kind of like a kick-off party for the “real holiday season”. Only in the past few years have I really learned to observe this day for what it is. Of course, only in the past few years have I really learned the importance of gratitude as a daily habit. (Thanks, Minimalism! You did that for me.)

Now, that’s not to say that I’ve spent my whole life being ungrateful. I like to think I’ve done a fairly good job of counting my blessings and taking very little for granted. But in all areas of life, there’s always room for improvement. For us, one of those improvements was in our observation of the 4th Thursday of November. Instead of a day to feast and fantasize about the month ahead, a few years ago we started spending our Thanksgiving just doing simple, quiet, fun things with one another. Why? Because, the most important part of our life, the things we are most thankful for, are just that – the times throughout the year when we spend our day together doing absolutely nothing other than what we want to do at that moment. And so we thought, what better way to show gratitude than to relish in those things that make us most happy.

One year, we made a tiny version of the traditional Thanksgiving meal and ate it while watching football. Another year, we walked the beach and had lunch at Cracker Barrel. And still another year, we ate ham sandwiches and read books on the balcony of our Florida apartment, while watching little alligators sunning in the yard below. In doing this, we not only allowed ourselves time to reflect and enjoy, but we also turned a previously hectic and sometimes stressful holiday into a peaceful celebration that we actually looked forward to each year. Thanksgiving was no longer the opening act for the spectacle we call Christmas. It was a day of gratitude, as it was intended to be.

When we moved to Tennessee, we tried to incorporate my family into our simple celebration and I’ll be honest, it has been a real challenge. Last year, per my Mom’s request, we made a traditional meal and invited everyone to her house. Only my niece and the baby showed up, so we had dinner for 5 and lots of leftovers. Angie watched football, my niece slept in the recliner, my mom reminisced about Thanksgivings past and fussed about how she was “never going to go through all the trouble again” since “no one appreciated it”, and I played in the floor with the baby. I remember thinking that we had somehow missed the point of this day. Here we were, a small family, but a family nonetheless, gathered together but still separate. We were there out of an obligation to celebrate an occasion rather than to celebrate the simple joy of being together. I don’t mean to imply that it was a bad day. It wasn’t. But it just wasn’t the day that it could have been.

This year we are going to try flipping the script. We’re celebrating Thanksgiving at our house. There will be no turkey, no gravy, no cranberry sauce. And no expectations.

Our door is going to be open all day to all members of our family. In fact, the invitation even says, “drop in anytime, stay as long as you like”. We’ll be here all day. There’s no dress code, no requirement to bring a dish. We are serving chicken (probably a pot pie) and a garden salad. The food will be here until it runs out and even then, we can always make a sandwich. Football will be on the TV and a fire in the fireplace. The toy box will be open. The patio has plenty of seating. The well of hot coffee and tea will never go dry.

Simple. Warm. Inviting. Home. That’s Thanksgiving to us.

The holidays are stressful enough as it is so we are hoping to replace that sense of obligation and pressure with the opportunity for others to enjoy a few of life’s simple pleasures –  delicious food, quiet moments, and good company – even if it’s just for the day.

Will this be the start of a new family tradition? Probably not. In all likelihood, it will be remembered as the year we tried to minimize everyone’s Thanksgiving (LOL), but I still have my fingers crossed. As Ghandi so fondly said, “Be the change…” 😊

**As a side note, the turkey pictured above passed away this week. Freckles was 12 years old. She lived a long happy life on Angie’s parent’s farm in Texas. She loved watermelon rinds, pecans, and giving kisses. 

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October Recap

Seriously, where did October go?? It seems like only yesterday we were packing for our trip to Canada and now, Halloween is over and we’re sitting smack dab in the middle of November 2nd!

When I looked at my bullet journal last night, the month of October was pretty sparse. We didn’t track much of anything during our vacation, except for miles walked. We went “off leash” on our eating…meaning, we enjoyed a bit of bacon with our oatmeal breakfast every now and then, sank our teeth into a lobster roll in Maine, and had a real soda…a blueberry soda at that. We also gave ourselves permission to enjoy afternoon froyos from the ice cream machine on the cruise ship. I suppose, we might have gained a few pounds this trip if it weren’t for all the walking. We walked 196.2 miles this month, bringing our total for the year to 797.8 miles.

A few other milestones for October include:

Having dinner with Angie’s grandma and aunt in Toledo, OH. This was the first time she had seen either of them in more than 20 years!

Taking Ticky (and her parents) to Trunk or Treat at Bledsoe Creek State Park. This was our first family outing since my niece moved back in with Ticky’s father. Everyone had a great time, though it was hard to keep the little one in costume.

We made 1.5 year’s worth of laundry soap. That’s 320 loads of laundry. At 4 loads a week (which is generous around our house – we usually average 2-3), that’s enough soap to last 80 weeks or more.

We had our first frost, but not before harvesting our last eggplants. My mom planted two eggplants in late June just to “see if they would grow” and lo and behold, they did. We ended up with 6 late season eggplants.

I finally started writing about our trip in our experience journal. The first entry is called Glamping in Niagara Falls. I always mean to write about our trips in real time but I’m usually too tired at the end of a fun day (or too far removed from the Internet) to do that. And besides, it’s probably better to focus on enjoying the experience rather than worrying about chronicling the journey anyway. There are plenty of cloudy days (like today) for writing. Or reading.

Speaking of which, the craziest thing happened last week with our library. I’ve been on a waiting list since July for Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less and since September for At Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe. When I checked the queue, I was still weeks away from checkout for either one so I checked out two other books I wanted to read and started both of them. Somehow, the very next day, both of my books on hold automatically checked out to me. I have 4 books to finish (now 3) in the next 2 weeks! Challenge accepted! I suppose this means I won’t have time for other people’s drama…I mean requests for my time…this month. Oh well 🙂

Ah, drama! Avoiding drama was the key reason why we wanted to do a happiness project this year anyway. The goals we set were specifically geared toward sharing experiences with one another; experiences that nourish our souls. And for the most part, we’ve done well with our project .

  • We’ve already read 54 books, exceeding our goal of 26 each.
  • We’ve cut back on eating meat, averaging 13.5 completely meatless days per month.
  • We’ve gone outside a lot more than last year to camp, hike, paddle, letterbox, garden, or just relax.
  • We’ve traveled to new places and experienced new things.

Though the year is not over, I can’t help but start to reflect on what all of this has meant so far. Has it decreased the amount of drama in our lives? Not at all. In fact, the drama is worse than ever. The holidays are approaching, after all. What it has done though is to help us better respond to the drama…and even that is still a work in progress. I’ll talk more about this in the remaining months of this year but in the meantime, we’re thinking about and planning for a new project in 2018. Stay tuned for more on that front too!

How was your October? Are you still on track with your goals for the year?